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Benton Scholars in Korea: Hannah O’Malley ’17

By Peter Tschirhart on July 9, 2014

Hannah O’Malley ’17 provides the following pictures and captions from the Benton Scholars’ trip to South Korea.


Colgate hasn't been around nearly as long as Gyeongbokgung Palace, which was completed in 1395.

Colgate hasn’t been around nearly as long as Gyeongbokgung Palace, which was completed in 1395.

Rice farms, like this one in the Hahoe Village, covered the countryside. Even though it is a relatively small country, the South Korean landscape includes mountains, cityscapes, rural expanses and seasides.

Rice farms, like this one in the Hahoe Village, covered the countryside. Even though it is a relatively small country, the South Korean landscape includes mountains, cityscapes, rural expanses and seasides.

Though media outlets may have stopped coverage of the Ferry Accident, homages like this one demonstrated that the memories of the children live on in the hearts of South Koreans.

Though media outlets may have stopped coverage of the Ferry Accident, homages like this one demonstrated that the memories of the children live on in the hearts of South Koreans.

“Named spaces bear witness to history and provide a glimpse into the future.” -John Syme The Sungnyemun Gate was erected in 1398 and embodies significant history—it has been repeatedly repaired after damage by natural causes, colonial rule, the Korean War, and a more recent attempt to burn the structure. Today, it is a national treasure of Seoul that speaks to South Corea’s resilience, an attitude which is behind its push to be a global power.

“Named spaces bear witness to history and provide a glimpse into the future.” -John Syme The Sungnyemun Gate was erected in 1398 and embodies significant history—it has been repeatedly repaired after damage by natural causes, colonial rule, the Korean War, and a more recent attempt to burn the structure. Today, it is a national treasure of Seoul that speaks to South Corea’s resilience, an attitude which is behind its push to be a global power.

It was election season while we were there so political campaigns were everywhere, especially in the more residential areas.

It was election season while we were there so political campaigns were everywhere, especially in the more residential areas.

We had the opportunity to visit an all-boys private middle school and speak to them about their educational experience. Our conversations with the students there sparked reflection and debate about both South Korea's and our own educational system.

We had the opportunity to visit an all-boys private middle school and speak to them about their educational experience. Our conversations with the students there sparked reflection and debate about both South Korea’s and our own educational system. Thank you so much to Dan Benton, Professor John Palmer, Woolim Cho, Peter Tschirhart, Sarah Ficken and the many others who made this experience and continue to make experiences like this possible!!


Benton Scholars in Korea: Brittney Dorow ’17

By Peter Tschirhart on June 23, 2014

Brittney Dorow ’17 recently returned from the Benton Scholars’ trip to South Korea. In this reflection, she discusses her youthful fascination with Asian cultures and her more recent interest in the vibrant mixture of “old and new” in contemporary Korean cityscapes–an interest that has lead her to the International Relations program at Colgate.


Growing up as a young girl with two brothers was a blessing.

I lived a life essentially free from gender. Yes, I was a female who loved dresses and tea parties and dress up dolls, but I was not limited to exploring one side of a culture many find to be split by sex. I played with cars, liked to wrestle and mess around, and I was equally as pleased to get the Pokemon Card as I was the Polly Pocket toy with my Happy Meal.

I think the greatest thing that came about being raised so openly centered on film and television.

One of my fondest memories was coming home from school on Friday’s to find my brothers down in the basement and a Japanese monster movie plugged in the VHS. I grew up watching these foreign films, moving from Godzilla movies with the boys, to dramatic and adventurous anime as I entered my teen years.

Overtime, my love for Asian culture developed. Entering into high school, it was safe to say I was obsessed. Watching anime and Korean Dramas with my friends while I picked at my meal with a pair of plastic chopsticks, I allowed myself to fall in love with it all, the people, the food, the fashion and so on.

More than anything else, I was enamored with the Asian city. Particularly in anime and film, I became fascinated with urban structure, a melting pot which combined the urban landscape of New York with the culture of traditional life. When I first discovered I could travel to Korea, I saw the perfect opportunity to finally see for myself if the culture I’d grown to idolize had been portrayed accurately or not.

A street market in South Korea.

A street market in South Korea.

I am happy to say, it had.

My picture shows one of the first markets we the Bentons explored in South Korea. Even from a glance, you can see the blending of new and old culture which I had hoped to find on this trip.

Tall industrialized buildings lit up with electric lights and neon signs.

Inside, traditional fans, bowls, street foods and cloth are sold.

Overall, I was not disappointed, but rather, in awe of the cultural phenomenon that is an Asian city, particularly a marketplace. I found a place of acceptance, of peaceful cultural blending, and well a preservation.

Most importantly, seeing a place like this reminded me why I love the study of culture and how I truly want to pursue my major in International Relations. I want to fall in love with all the cultures of the world, and feel this amazement for the rest of my life.


Benton Scholars in Korea: Ishir Dutta ’17

By Peter Tschirhart on June 13, 2014

The following pictures and captions by Ishir Dutta ’17 continue our coverage of the Benton Scholars’ trip to Korea. Stay tuned for more posts in the coming days.


Click the image below to launch a slideshow:

"It's the East Sea, not the Sea of Japan!" - Prof. Palmer

“It’s the East Sea, not the Sea of Japan!” – Prof. Palmer

In a place closer to home (At Namsan Tower)

In a place closer to home (At Namsan Tower)

...and my other home. (At Insadong)

…and my other home. (At Insadong)

Even amid the frenzy, we found calm.

Even amid the frenzy, we found calm.


Benton Scholars in Korea: Andrew Isaacson ’17

By Peter Tschirhart on June 12, 2014

Our blog series on the recent Benton Scholars trip to South Korea continues with pictures and captions provided by Andrew Isaacson ’17.


Seoul, South Korea: a city and country hidden in the mountains.

Seoul, South Korea: a city and country hidden in the mountains.

What does your garden look like? -Deoksugung palace gardens.

What does your garden look like? -Deoksugung palace gardens.

When I asked Joe Chacra '17 what he wanted to do with our free day, he replied, "let's get lost." And so we did, ending our expedition at the Seoul National Cemetery.

When I asked Joe Chacra ’17 what he wanted to do with our free day, he replied, “let’s get lost.” And so we did, ending our expedition at the Seoul National Cemetery.

 

 


Benton Scholars in Korea: Zachary Weaver ’17

By Peter Tschirhart on June 10, 2014

The following text and pictures were provided by Zachary Weaver ’17, who recently returned from the Benton Scholars’ trip to South Korea. Their journey was lead by John Palmer, Assoc. Professor of Educational Studies and Chair of the Educational Studies Department.


'17 Benton Scholars gather for a picture following a performance of traditional Korean dance.

’17 Benton Scholars gather for a picture following a performance of traditional Korean dance.

South Korea was easily the best trip I have ever been on. I can’t really compare it to anything else. Everything, from the culture to what the places we visited, allowed all the Bentons who went on this trip to really experience what South Korea was like, rather than just getting a voyeuristic view that is ever so common on shorter trips. It’s kind of hard to find a place to start.

A sewer grate in Seoul

A sewer grate in Seoul

The food was fantastic. Before leaving, I was worried about whether or not I would be able to find something that I could eat easily. I need not have been so worried. The food you can get in South Korea is delicious, comes in large quantities, and is cheap. You could easily find bulgogi (marinated beef that you often cook at the table) that probably feed at least 3 people for around $5 US Dollars. Often, we were able to find something for everybody (even with allergies accounted for) for a fraction of the price that we would have paid in the US, and with a lot more food as well. One thing about Korean food is that it isn’t based around one dish like it is in the US. Whereas in the US you would order a burger and fries and that would be you meal, in Korea you might order bibimbap (rice with various vegetables in a hot stone bowl, where you mix a raw egg in to cook before eating), but in addition you would get little dishes of sauces, vegetables, and never ending kimchi (spicy fermented cabbage) for the table.

One of our last meals in Korea

One of our last meals in Korea

Our trip through South Korea was a whirlwind of activity. We saw so many things and visited so many places; I would forget everything we did if not for the pictures. From the palaces in Seoul to a traditional folk village in the south of the nation, we really went everywhere. Thanks to Prof. John Palmer of the Ed. Studies department, we were able to see a Korea that many of us wouldn’t see if we had just gone there on our own. Ask anyone who went on the trip, and I’m sure you will see that all of us had the time of our lives in Korea.

'17 Benton Scholars Zachary Weaver and Ishir Dutta stand for a picture in front of the Blue House, the residence of the President of South Korea.

’17 Benton Scholars Zachary Weaver and Ishir Dutta stand for a picture in front of the Blue House, the residence of the President of South Korea.


Benton Scholars visit WCNY

By Peter Tschirhart on May 12, 2014
Benton Scholars and staff on the set of WCNY's "Ivory Tower."

Benton Scholars and staff on the set of WCNY’s “Ivory Tower.”

A small group of Benton Scholars and Colgate staff visited the studios of local PBS affiliate WCNY last Friday, May 9, 2014. Students attended a taping of The Ivory Tower, a weekly political and current events round-table featuring a panel of local academics, hosted by David Rubin, Professor and Dean Emeritus of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, and featuring Tim Byrnes, current Faculty Director of the Benton Scholars.

Following Nicholas Kristof’s recent critique of academia’s apparent insularity, students in the Benton Program saw first-hand how scholars from a variety of backgrounds could gather to discuss local issues in an engaging and public forum. They also received a behind-the-scenes tour of television broadcast operations at WCNY’s stunning LEED Platinum facilities–including sound stages, meeting rooms, and the broadcast control and editing room.


Celebrating ’14 Benton Scholars

By Peter Tschirhart on May 5, 2014

Students, faculty, and staff gathered this past weekend to celebrate Benton Scholars graduating in the class of 2014. The event, a barbecue at Merrill House, welcomed about 35 students from all years of the program. Each senior was given a book, a copy of The Hard Thing About Hard Things, along with a Class of 2014 Benton Scholars commemorative glass.

Graduating '14 Benton Scholars pose with Asst. Dean Peter Tschirhart and outgoing Benton Scholars Faculty Director Tim Byrnes.

Graduating ’14 Benton Scholars pose at the barbecue with Asst. Dean Peter Tschirhart and outgoing Benton Scholars Faculty Director Tim Byrnes.

Graduating students have a diverse range of post-Colgate plans: from real estate and Teach for America, to Wall Street banking and Proctor & Gamble. We wish them the very best and hope to see them at future Benton Scholars alumni events.

This weekend’s lunch also celebrated the six-year tenure of Prof. Tim Byrnes, who lead the Benton Program from its inception. His leadership and enthusiasm shaped the Benton program in more ways than can be counted, and he served as a strong mentor and advocate for students in the program. Byrnes will be succeeded, beginning in the fall of 2014, by Prof. Karen Harpp.


“Postcards” from Washington, DC

By Peter Tschirhart on March 26, 2014

Eleven Benton Scholars recently completed a successful four-day spring break trip to Washington D.C. While there, they visited a number of sites relevant to global leadership, including the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum and The White House.

Benton Scholars visiting the White House Press Room with Colgate Alum Steve Posner, Associate Director for Strategic Planning and Communications.

Benton Scholars visiting the White House Press Room with Colgate Alumnus Steve Posner, Associate Director for Strategic Planning and Communications in the Office of Management and Budget.

Benton Scholars with Col. Scott Willey, in front of the B-29 "Enola Gay" at the Smithsonian's Air & Space Museum.

Benton Scholars with Col. Scott Willey, in front of the B-29 “Enola Gay” at the Smithsonian’s Air & Space Museum.


BS Trip to Argentina

By Nicci Moran-Guiati '16 on May 17, 2013

As I pack for our departure in 3 days, the excitement for the trip is clearly escalating. Argentina themed snapchats are running rampant amongst the Bentons. Obviously everyone is pretty excited. It’s hard to say what part of the trip I’m most excited for, but I think in terms of culture, I’m really excited to see how the Italian presence in Argentina has influenced the culture there. I’m also really excited just to see the amazing architecture in Buenos Aires. Supposedly, it’s been called the Paris of South America, so I’m extremely excited to see the architecture, one of my favorite parts of traveling. When we go to Salta and Iguazu Falls, I can’t wait to see the terrain. I’ve never been to a place with such extreme variations in terrain so I can’t wait to see the mountains, the flatlands, the lakes, the rainforest, and obviously to see some llamas. It should be an amazing B.S. adventure.


Ellis Island

By bentonscholars on April 16, 2013

Foner

In 2010, a group of Benton Scholars traveled to Ellis Island in New York City to learn about the great importance it played in the history of immigration to the US.  They were accompanied on this trip by members of a local Hamilton group called “Lifelong Learners.”  Upon their return to Colgate. the Benton Scholars arranged to have Professor Nancy Foner of Hunter College come to Colgate and speak on her book “From Ellis Island to JFK: New York’s Two Great Waves of Immigration.”

Ellis Island

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