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Professor Fernando Plata Publishes Article and Serves as Guest Editor

By Department of Romance Languages and Literatures on October 30, 2018

Professor Plata published an article on Francisco de Quevedo in a festschrift honoring Professor Arellano of the University of Navarra (and F’00 Distinguished Visiting Professor at Colgate). Additionally, Professor Plata was guest editor of the 2018 issue of the journal La Perinola, devoted to the art of caricature in Quevedo. The volume contains 16 peer-reviewed essays by scholars from Spain, Switzerland, Italy, France, Chile and the US.


Professor Fernando Plata Delivers Talks at Two International Conferences

By Department of Romance Languages and Literatures on October 30, 2018

In April, Professor Plata participated in an international conference in Pamplona (Spain) where he spoke on the performances of Calderón’s allegorical play Life is Dream. In May, he participated in an international conference in Cusco (Peru), where he spoke on the perinola (a predecessor to the teetotum) and its development from the Viceroyalty of Peru to Spain, and back to Latin America.


Danced Translations of Hamilton created by Amanda Lee

By Department of Romance Languages and Literatures on September 18, 2018

Thursday, October 18 at 7:00 p.m, Palace Theater, Hamilton

In Danced Translations of Hamilton, a multimedia dance performance, Visiting Assistant Professor Amanda Lee investigates the meaning and responsibility of community through the experiences of 3 generations of Hamilton women. While Hamilton, NY is shaped by its unique geographical location, many of the community’s concerns are universal. Professor Lee staged a prototype of this show at the international Festival Off d’Avignon in July 2018.

https://hamiltontheaterdocuments.wordpress.com/portfolio/danced-translations-of-hamilton/

http://www.avignonleoff.com/programme/2018/lee-amanda-mes18/

ABOUT THE ARTIST
Amanda Lee is Visiting Assistant Professor of French and Women’s Studies at Colgate University. In 2018, she choreographed and performed in the international Festival Off d’Avignon in France, and earned her Certification from the American Ballet Theatre in the National Training Curriculum, Levels I-III.

While at Colgate she staged a dramatic reading of Oscar Wilde’s Salomé, featuring a reconstruction of the “Dance of the Seven Veils.” Previously, she has performed in works by Leverage Dance Theatre under the direction of Dianna Barrios, Common Thread Contemporary Dance under the direction of Jennifer Medina, the Slaughter Project under the direction of Cecil Slaughter, and Missouri Ballet Theatre under the direction of Adam Sage. Ever expanding her movement horizons, she also performed with experimental performance artist Thomas Brady and aerial dance choreographer Monica Newsam at SATORI in St. Louis, Missouri. She trained in ballet and modern dance at Bard College at Simon’s Rock, Washington University in St. Louis, as well as the Center of Creative Arts (COCA), attending summer intensives at the Martha Graham School and the Big Muddy Dance Company. Her article “The Romantic Ballet and the Nineteenth-Century Poetic Imagination,” out in Dance Chronicle: Studies in Dance and the Related Arts, vol. 39.1, won the 2017 Center for European Studies First Article Prize.


The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures opens Casa Italia

By Department of Romance Languages and Literatures on September 11, 2018

The beginning of the semester has marked the opening of Casa Italia at the WM Keck Center for Language Study.

In conversations with the Italian faculty and the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Italian Intern Giuseppe Grispino proposed the idea of Casa Italia to promote the study of Italian here at Colgate. Besides the Tuesday Table of Babel at Frank Dining Hall, Casa Italia integrates and supports the elementary and intermediate language courses offered at Colgate.  Casa Italia aims to bring together and connect students and faculty interested in learning or practicing Italian. At Casa Italia we organize peer-tutoring sessions and support students through the whole learning process. Students also have the possibility to watch movies, TV programs, read newspapers and magazines in the original. In other words, being in Casa Italia feels like being in Italy away from Italy.

Casa Italia is open on Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays at the Keck Center when classes are in session.
Mondays from 4.30 pm to 5.30pm.
Wednesdays from 8pm to 10pm.
Thursdays from 2pm to 5pm.

Learning Italian has never been easier!
Benvenuti a Casa Italia!
Welcome to Casa Italia!


Professor Rojas-Paiewonsky receives Balmuth teaching award

By Department of Romance Languages and Literatures on May 14, 2018

Professor Lourdes Rojas, Charles A. Dana Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and Africana and Latin American Studies, has been awarded the Jerome Balmuth award for teaching. The Balmuth award, created through a gift by Mark Siegel (Colgate class of 1973), recognizes teaching that is “distinctively successful and transformative.” Professor Rojas shares the 2018 Balmuth Prize with Chris Vecsey, Harry Emerson Fosdick Professor of the Humanities and Native American Studies


2018 Dijon Study Group visits Loire Valley

By Department of Romance Languages and Literatures on April 6, 2018

The Dijon Study Group visited the great Renaissance châteaux of the region, including Chambord, Chenonceau, Azay-le-Rideau and Amboise. Everyone had an amazing time.


Professor Fernando Plata delivers a talk on early modern Spanish theater in Madrid and publishes two book chapters on Francisco de Quevedo.

By Department of Romance Languages and Literatures on January 26, 2018

On December 14, 2017, while in Madrid directing Colgate’s study group, Professor Fernando Plata delivered a talk to graduate students at the Universidad Complutense. The talk, “Saboyardos, titíes y purichinelas en las mojigangas del mundinovo (de Calderón a Zamora)” dealt with marmosets, Frenchmen, string puppets and other characters that appear in “raree-shows”, a transmedial device used for the first time in Spain in carnival plays of the second half of the 17th century. Recently Professor Plata has published two book chapters on Francisco de Quevedo (1580-1645). The chapters deal with the textual transmission of a satirical piece, La Perinola (The Teetotum), written by Quevedo in 1632, and with Quevedo’s literary connections to his contemporary Luis Vélez de Guevara.
“La transmisión textual de La Perinola de Quevedo.” In Quevedo en su contexto europeo. Política y Religión. Traducciones y textos burlescos. Ed. M. J. Alonso Veloso. Vigo: Editorial Academia del Hispanismo, 2017. 165-184.

“Sobre el elogio de Quevedo a Vélez de Guevara en La Perinola, con Pero Vázquez de Escamilla al fondo.” In Quevedo en Europa, Europa en Quevedo. Ed. M. J. Alonso Veloso. Vigo: Editorial Academia del Hispanismo, 2017. 275-289.


New published essay by Professor Frederick Luciani on Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz

By Department of Romance Languages and Literatures on January 26, 2018

Professor Frederick Luciani has recently published an essay in the collection Ingenio y feminidad: Nuevos enfoques sobre la estética de Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, ed. Barbara Ventarola (Madrid: Iberoamericana / Frankfurt: Vervuert, 2017). The essay, “Una reconsideración de la comedia Amor es más laberinto de Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz y Juan de Guevara,” offers an updated reading of a seldom studied mythological comedia of which Sor Juana (Mexico: 1651?-1695) was the primary author.


French Club Visits New Orleans

By Department of Romance Languages and Literatures on January 25, 2018

The French Club went to New Orleans during first weekend of Thanksgiving break. They spent the weekend exploring the French Quarter learning about the Creole and Cajun history in the Region. At the culinary workshop they attended, they learned how to prepare some traditional New Orleans meals. They ate beignets at Cafe du Monde, and watched street musicians play jazz.


Assistant Professor Monica Facchini publishes book on Italian cinema

By Department of Romance Languages and Literatures on December 6, 2017

In 1949, André Bazin claimed that representing death on the screen was a “metaphysical obscenity.” However, in her just released book Spettacolo della morte e “tecniche del cordoglio” nel cinema degli anni sessanta (Rome: Bulzoni, 2017) Prof. Monica Facchini claims that the representation of death in certain Italian political cinema becomes the necessary means to unveil marginal realities in modern society, investigate power relations between different social groups, and rip off the mask of feigned certainties and ostentatious happiness in the society of the spectacle.

https://www.bulzoni.it/it/catalogo/4921/spettacolo-della-morte-e-tecniche-del-cordoglio-nel-cinema-degli-anni-sessanta.html

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