Home - Distinctly Colgate - Sustainability - Sustainability News
Sustainability News

Latest Posts

The Privileged People’s Climate March

By Sustainability Office on May 5, 2017

-Madison Smith ’19

This past weekend, I attended the People’s Climate March in Washington, D.C. with fellow Green Raider interns Grace Thomas ’17, Jackson Lucas ’17, Kimberly Duncan ’18, Ashlea Raemer ’18, and Chloe Matonis ’18. The purpose of the march was to bring climate change to the attention of our current administration, and that it is, in fact, real and caused by human activity.

Climate change is not only causing the polar bears to go extinct, but it is a problem that impacts people – specifically the people who are contributing to it the least. As Grace Thomas put it, climate change is a race, a poverty, and a feminist issue. As a result, we want actions to be taken and policy to be created that moves the United States towards renewable every, environmental justice, and puts an emphasis on science.

Although having 200,000 people march from our nation’s Capitol to the White House is both powerful and well-intentioned, it is important to acknowledge how such events can perpetuate the under-representation of the marginalized groups mentioned above. While marching, I noticed an overall lack of diversity amongst the crowds of people. At the same time, I realized how much of a privilege it is to be able to travel eight hours, stay in comfortable accommodations, and fight for something that I believe so much in, yet does not directly impact me. Many Americans who are feeling the burdens of sea-level rise, poor hazardous waste management, and government ignorance (for example, the people of Flint, Michigan), do not have the resources to travel all the way to where their government officials are located in order to tell their stories and hopefully catalyze change.

I, and the rest of the Office of Sustainability interns, had an incredible time marching for climate action and hope to participate in more events in the future. For those who missed the march but still want to fight against climate change may contact their senators and other government officials, stay up to date on current events and policies, and spread the word. Most importantly, we need to bring Colgate’s Carbon Neutrality pledge to the forefront of campus, rather than relying on offsets, by reducing activities that lead to emissions and demanding eco-friendly buildings from administrators. At the same time, it is important for us to keep our privilege at the forefront of our activism and to remember that we are fighting for all humans, not just in the U.S., but across the globe.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Colgate Continues Commitment to Sustainability through AASHE

By Sustainability Office on April 20, 2017

What is AASHE?

The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) is an association of colleges and universities that are working to create a sustainable future. To further its mission of empowering higher education to lead the sustainability transformation, AASHE provides resources, professional development, and a network of support to enable institutions of higher education to model sustainability in all areas, from governance and operations to education and research.

AASHE defines sustainability in an inclusive way, encompassing human and ecological health, social justice, secure livelihoods, and a better world for all generations.  AASHE is a member-driven, independent 501(c)(3).

Details:

Colgate University has recently renewed its membership in the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education to further campus efforts toward building a healthy and just world.

Colgate University first joined AASHE in 2009 and, through membership, has received continued support in advancing its sustainability initiatives throughout the institution and in the community.

“Over the years, AASHE has been a great partner to Colgate,” Colgate Director of Sustainability, John Pumilio, stated. “Their publications, network, and weekly newsletter provides up-to-date and relevant information. The fact that all Colgate community members have access to their resources adds tremendous value to our work here on campus.”

AASHE enables higher education institutions to meet their sustainability goals by providing specialized resources, professional development, and a network of peer support.  Membership covers every individual at an institution, so the entire campus community can take advantage of member benefits.

AASHE hosts the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS), a comprehensive campus sustainability rating system that enables institutions to measure their progress and learn from others. In Colgate’s most recent assessment, the university received a STARS Gold rating. With STARS as a roadmap, institutions can select meaningful and appropriate pathways to sustainability while conserving valuable resources, combating global warming, and building healthier communities.

Additionally, Colgate’s AASHE membership and STARS report have provided numerous avenues for engaged scholarship. Just this academic year, ENST 241 and CORE 128S A have incorporated projects related to the report into the curriculum as a way for students to get exposure to sustainability and climate action planning in the classroom.

AASHE is also one of two supporting organizations for the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment. Colgate signed this commitment in 2009, pledging to be carbon neutral by our bicentennial in 2019. Over 860 presidents and chancellors so far have committed to lead their institutions to climate neutrality as soon as possible.

“AASHE counts on the support of progressive institutions like Colgate University to fulfill its mission of facilitating leadership to transform our planet,” said AASHE Executive Director Meghan Fay Zahniser. “As the gateways to knowledge, higher education institutions have a unique opportunity to make sustainability part of everyone’s agenda.”

Resources available to you through AASHE:

AASHE e-Newsletters
The AASHE Bulletin is a weekly publication that delivers the latest in campus sustainability news, resources, opportunities, events, and jobs and internships. AASHE Announcements is a monthly publication that highlights news, events and important information about AASHE and its members. STARS Update is a periodic publication designed to keep participants up-to-date on the latest STARS technical developments, publications, deadlines, tips and tools.

Online Resources
AASHE’s Campus Sustainability Hub is an online resource library that provides access to 6,000+ valuable resources for campus sustainability practitioners, enabling AASHE members to share and learn about all aspects of sustainability in higher education. Resources are organized by sustainability topic (e.g., curriculum, public engagement, energy, investment) and content type (e.g., academic program, case study, conference presentation, photograph).

Professional Development
AASHE presents or co-sponsors workshops and webinars throughout the year, as well as an annual conference that serves as the largest stage in North America for higher education sustainability practitioners to take advantage of face-to-face networking in a collaborative environment. These events offer opportunities to connect with our colleagues at regional, national and international levels to share resources. As members, we receive discounts on registration for all AASHE events. Check this listing for upcoming events.

Product and Service Discounts
AASHE business and nonprofit members offer exclusive product and service discounts for institutional members.

STARS Registration Discount
As a member, our institution receives a reduced fee for participating in AASHE’s Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS), a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Publicity and Recognition
We can submit news, opportunities, resources, events, and job postings to the AASHE Bulletin (be sure to read the submission guidelines first). The Bulletin informs more than 9,000 subscribers in the campus sustainability community.

Professional Awards
Our campus can submit applications for any of the AASHE Sustainability Awards, in the categories of Campus Sustainability Achievement, Campus Sustainability Research and Student Sustainability Leadership.

Campus Sustainability Perspectives Blog
AASHE’s Campus Sustainability Perspectives blog features opinions and reports by staff and guests related to campus sustainability. You can read the blog, comment on posts and request to submit your own items as a guest blogger. There is also a chronological archive page and a comprehensive list of other blogs related to campus sustainability.

AASHE Member Logo
We can post the AASHE Member Logo on our website to emphasize our commitment to sustainability. The logo may also be used on any signage, reports, brochures, and publicity or display materials. Be sure to read the usage guidelines before publishing.

Governance, Councils, Committees
Anyone from our campus is welcome to submit for consideration to serve on AASHE’s Board of Directors, Advisory Council, STARS Steering Committee, or STARS Technical Advisors.

Individual Member Accounts
To access member-only pages on AASHE’s website and take advantage of member benefits, individuals must first create their own account. To create an individual account, go to the register page and complete a user profile using your campus email address. After you receive an email with your password, go to the login page, enter your email address (username) and new password, and you will have access to the entirety of online resources.

If you have any questions about AASHE or our benefits as a member, email membership@aashe.org. Again, every individual at Colgate can take advantage of these membership benefits from AASHE, so be sure to set up an account and get started today!


Sustainability for the Lazy

By Sustainability Office on April 2, 2017
-Delaney Pals ’18

A common preconceived notion is that one has to make great sacrifices in their life in order to be sustainable. However, there are many little things you can do each day that will help make a big difference, without having to drastically change your lifestyle, or even leave your couch! The list below highlights easy things you can do to help the environment:

  • (Red)Meatless Monday: By cutting just one meal of red meat out of your diet, you can drastically reduce your carbon footprint. You can decrease it even further by making that meal completely vegetarian. According to The Guardian, “red meat requires 28 times more land to produce than pork or chicken, 11 times more water and results in five times more climate-warming emissions.”
  • Bring a reusable mug/cup with you: Many departments on campus have free tea/coffee/cocoa and hot water, so save the $2.50 and the disposable cup by bringing your own!

    Image retrieved from http://www.chargerbulletin.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/carbon-footprint.jpg

  • Decrease your use of K-Cups: K-Cups are not recyclable in typical recycling collections and they end up in landfills. Reports indicate that the number of K-Cups sold in 2014 could circle the globe 10.5 times. If cutting K-Cups out completely is not an option, you can collect them and recycle at the International Office or buy a reusable K-Cup.
  • Keep your windows closed when the heat is on: Even though opening the window might make it feel cooler inside, the heater will keep cranking heat to keep the room at the temperature to which the thermostat is set. So a more environmentally friendly option is to turn down the thermostat instead of opening your window. Cuddle up in a blanket if you’re still cold!
  • Wash clothes on the brights or cold setting: Households that switch to cold water save 1600 pounds of CO2 emissions per year.3 These emissions come from heating the water used to wash clothes, so switching to cold water (which is shown to be as effective in washing clothes given our efficient detergents) helps you reduce these emissions. To save even more energy – and help your clothes last longer – avoid putting your clothes in the dryer and instead use a drying rack.
  • Use your energy-efficient dishwasher: Studies have shown that hand washing dishes uses 27 gallons of water on average and 2.5 kW hours to heat the water (for 12 place settings), whereas an energy-efficient dishwasher only uses 4 gallons of water and 1 kW hour of energy per load.  So load up your dishwasher, not only saving you time and energy, but also helping the environment!
  • Bring reusable bags to Price Chopper: And recycle your old non-reusable bags there as well!

Check out this list from the UN Sustainable Development Goals to learn about more easy things you can do each day to decrease your carbon footprint and help the environment without dramatically altering your lifestyle. If every person implements some of these minor changes in their lives, together we can make a big difference.


Get Ready for 13 Days of Green!

By Sustainability Office on March 31, 2017
-Isabel Dove ’19

It’s time to get ready for every Colgate student’s favorite spring tradition – no, not SPW – 13 Days of Green!

For the past eight years, the Sustainability Office has hosted programming during the 13 days leading up to and including Earth Day on April 22nd. The 13 Days of Green are meant to foster a culture of environmental stewardship and social equity by engaging the Colgate & Hamilton communities in sustainability as we come together to celebrate Earth Day. This year, we have tons of fun, engaging, and green events for students, faculty, and community members to learn about sustainability and help Colgate reach its goal of carbon neutrality by 2019.

The 13 Days of Green will begin on Monday, April 10 with a kickoff festival at 3:30 on the academic quad. There will be food, games, music, seedlings to take home, and zero waste! After the kickoff, the festivities will continue throughout the next 12 days. Here are some of the highlights:

  • The Green Summit and Oak Awards on 4/13
  • Spring Cleaning Clothing Swap on 4/15
  • A movie screening of Before the Flood on 4/19
  • The Earth Day Zero-Waste SPW Brunch on 4/22

By attending these events, you will be entered into a raffle for a chance to win sustainable prizes such as an ENO hammock, solar-powered bluetooth speakers, and a Nalgene water bottle!

Also be sure to keep an eye on the campus calendar and look out for ENST brown bags and sustainable events sponsored by other organizations, such as the Broad Street Gallery and Green Thumbs’ Locavore Dinner!
Although environmental protection should be celebrated every day, these 13 days will enthusiastically highlight sustainability within the Colgate community. Check out http://www.colgate.edu/distinctly-colgate/sustainability/13-days-of-green for a full calendar of events for the 13 Days of
Green and follow us on social media to find out how you can live everyday like it’s Earth Day!


Is unsolicited campus mail getting you down? Here’s what you can do!

By Sustainability Office on September 15, 2016

Many individuals on campus are frustrated by the amount of unsolicited mail they receive.  Not only are some of these advertisements and other announcements bothersome, but they also waste heaps of paper, ink, and toner — not to mention the time and money spent printing, delivering, and recycling these announcements.  According to The Center for a New American Dream (whose mission is to advance sustainability by shifting the way we consume), reducing unsolicited mail can have big environmental benefits.  Did you know:

Photo Credit: Wall Street Journal

Photo Credit: Wall Street Journal

  • Americans spend over 8 months of our lives opening junk mail.
  • Over 100 million trees are cut down annually to produce unsolicited mail.  That’s the equivalent of completely deforesting the Adirondacks in only 3 years.
  • 44% of unsolicited mail is never even opened.
  • Only 1 in 5 pieces of junk mail is recycled.
  • Over 5.6 million tons of paper promotions are landfilled each year.
  • Americans pay $370 million annually to dispose of unsolicited mail.

It is no wonder so many faculty, staff, and students are unnerved by the amount of unsolicited mail we receive.  But what can you do?  Below are a few tips:

1) Reduce it on campus. Did you know that Colgate has five separate mail distribution lists?

  • Distribution A goes to every employee on campus (~940 mailings)
  • Distribution B goes to every faculty member on campus (~540 mailings)
  • Distribution C goes to every faculty member and administrator (~610 mailings)
  • Distribution D goes to each department (one per department or ~115 mailings)
  • Distribution E goes to each student (~2,900 mailings)

If you are producing mail to be distributed on campus, you can easily change your campus distribution list from mailing list A to mailing list D and save over 800 pieces of mail. Alternatively, if you receive unsolicited campus mail from a campus department or program, contact them with a gentle reminder to switch their distribution list. This small change can significantly reduce the amount of paper used, the associated costs to a department and our university’s carbon footprint.

2) Make it eco-friendly. In the event that you need to produce campus mail, use FSC® Certified paper stock. This will significantly reduce the environmental (and social) impacts of producing your mail by ensuring your products come from responsibly managed forests. You can also opt to use soy-based inks. These environmentally friendly inks are renewable, biodegradable and more easily removed during the recycling process. They often produce a richer pigment quality, as well.

3) Recycle it. When you dispose of your mail, please be sure to recycle it in one of the paper recycling bins located in your building.

4) Cut down on mail from outside marketers.  If you receive campus mail from outside marketers or organizations, try this:

  • Register for the National Do Not Mail List.  This free service is quick and easy and gives you the option to continue to receive mailings of your choice.  DirectMail.com will contact you every six months via e-mail so you can review and update your preferences.  Visit DirectMail.com to register at http://www.directmail.com/mail_preference/.
  • Ask companies to stop sending you catalogs.  If you receive unwanted catalogs or other mail from specific sources, call the toll-free customer service number to request that your name be removed from their mailing list. Also, make your request via e-mail from the company’s website. Have the mailing label handy when you call, or attach a picture of it to your email.  No doubt this takes time, but think of all the time you save by not having to deal with unwanted catalogs that routinely show up on campus.  Also, Catalog Choice offers a free service that sends opt-out requests for individual companies on your behalf.
  • At home, if you receive unwanted mail from credit card companies, call 1-888-OPT OUT (or 1-888-567-8688) 24 hours a day.  One short call will remove your name and address from Equifax, TransUnion, Experian and Innovis!

Do you have other ideas on how to reduce or eliminate unsolicited mail?  Please share!

Have other questions about recycling on campus?  Visit our FAQ post!

Thanks for doing your part to save resources and reduce waste on campus and at home!


Now hiring garden interns!

By Sustainability Office on July 20, 2016

pic3-min

Department: Sustainability Office
Hours per Week: 6 hrs during fall semester

Job Description:
The Sustainability Office is offering a paid Garden Internship to a qualified student starting in mid/late-August 2016 until November 2016 (the end of the growing season). The garden intern will help manage and promote the one-half acre vegetable/herb garden and greenhouse on campus. This is a physically demanding, yet very rewarding job. Work includes exposure to outdoor elements (e.g., heat, sun, rain, etc.). The student intern is expected to coordinate and organize volunteers and student work parties. The Garden Intern will report directly to our garden manager (Beth Roy) and work in close collaboration with other garden interns and other Colgate students, faculty, and staff. The student intern will gain life-long skills and knowledge in harvesting and maintaining a garden, organizing events, and supervising volunteer workers.
Required Skills and Experience

Key Responsibilities:
• Work with garden manager (Beth Roy) to plan and manage the garden during the fall season. Specific tasks may include preparing soil, cultivating, planting, weeding, and harvesting.
• Organize and supervise volunteer work parties.
• Coordinate with Green Thumbs presidents to schedule a weekly time for volunteer work parties, and be at the garden during those scheduled times to supervise the work parties.
• Provide continuity for work on the garden throughout the 2016 growing season.
• Prepare for and help run a weekly Farm Stand to sell produce from the garden.
Recommended Qualifications and Skills:
• Strong work ethic and self-motivated.
• Strong interpersonal and communication skills.
• Preference will be given to those with experience and firsthand knowledge in farming and/or gardening with vegetable crops; though previous garden experience is not required.
• Experience organizing and supervising the work of others.
• Tolerance for hard work and exposure to outdoor elements.
• Excitement about promoting local farming and local food production

Work Requirements and Benefits
The garden internship position is rewarding but demanding work that involves physical exertion and exposure to the outdoor elements.
Starting Hourly Rate: Fall semester – $8.50/hour (estimated because Financial Aid determines pay rate)

Supervisor: Beth Roy, Garden Manager

Key Contacts: John Pumilio, Director of Sustainability; Christopher Henke, Associate Professor and faculty advisor to the garden; Beth Roy, Colgate Community Garden Consultant

To apply, send a resume and one page cover letter to the Garden Manager, Beth Roy (eroy@colgate.edu) and fill out an application on the Colgate Portal.
The application deadline is August 5. Employment will begin on or around August 15.


June Updates at the Garden

By Sustainability Office on July 5, 2016

With the recent rain falls and the rays of sun, the garden is looking very green and luscious! If you haven’t had chance to stop by (which you should definitely do during our open volunteer hours Tuesday 12-2 PM and Thursday 4:30-6:30 PM) and roam through the rows and rows of sprouting veggies, here are some updates! Our lettuce, radishes, kale, and chard are pluggin’ away and giving us lots to share! Snap peas practically popped out overnight this week with some impressive 5-inchers! And we had our first two squash after the wonderful rain!

pic1-min pic2-min

With such a great abundance, we have been harvesting for some very successful farm stands as well as for Chartwells, the dining service at Colgate, and the Food Cupboard located in Hamilton. Through all these sales and donations, we have been meeting many wonderful people and we are so thankful for all their help and the connections we’ve made. We would like to thank all of our farm stand regulars, our generous community plot members for words of encouragement (and delicious donuts!), and Chartwells dining services for supporting local food.

pic3-min

We would also like to give a big shout out to all our weekly volunteers, and namely our volunteer group from the library. Last week, a group of library staff members came down to be out in the sun for a few hours and give us a helping hand. They mulched, weeded, and planted parsley and brussel sprouts! To cool off and relax after their hard work, they sat in the shade and were able to paint some of the most beautiful and unique rocks our garden has ever seen. The garden looked so healthy and lively after they left and we are so grateful for all the time and energy they put in.

pic4-min pic5-min

Our next work party will be Wednesday July 6th from 5-7pm. Come to garden, enjoy good vibes, and eat delicious (and garden-sourced) food! And we are happy to announce that our Farm Stand is officially every Tuesday from 4:30-6:30 in front of Trudy Fitness Center right across from the Sanford Fieldhouse. On rainy days, we’ll be located inside Trudy at the sign-in desk! Hope to see you there! And remember to stay fresh and eat local!


Organic Pest Control at the Colgate Community Garden (and yours!)

By Sustainability Office on June 30, 2016

No matter how careful you are about keeping your garden clean and maintained, you are bound to run into some pests. At the Colgate Community Garden we have lots of critters that get to our food and it is important to be proactive in controlling them. To do so, we choose to use only organic methods as to reduce our impact on the surrounding land and create the healthiest produce possible. We have compiled some of our methods here for you so that you may implement them in your own garden or plot at the CCG.

Some common pests in the Upstate NY area include slugs, beetles, grasshoppers, and birds. The most vulnerable time for your plants is when they are young, as they are weak, and when they begin producing fruit.

It is often possible to determine which pest is getting at your plants based on the type of damage they leave. Once the pest is identified, you can begin steps towards prevention. Below are some common pests at the Colgate Community Garden, the damage they leave, and the steps we take to prevent them.

Common Pests and their damages

Beetles: Beetles typically leave small pinholes in the leaves of young leafy plants. They especially love our arugula and spinach plants. To keep out beetles we cover our plants with Diatomaceous earth after every rain. This method is explained below.

pic1-min

Slugs: Slugs typically leave larger damage than hard-shelled insects at the center and edges of leaves. To keep out slugs we use cups of beer in the ground. Slugs are attracted to the yeast in the beer and when they go for it, they drown in the cup. This method is further explained below.

pic2-min

Cutworms: These worms are most dangerous to our tomato plants, but can affect a wide variety of species,. They work by wrapping around the base of the plant tightly and severing the stem. The plant subsequently dies. To prevent these worms, we wrap the base of our tomato plants in a ring of newspaper. This method is further explained below.

pic3

Birds: Birds especially love berries and corn and thus your plants are most vulnerable to birds in their later stages. PLus, birds love earthworms, which are super beneficial to the soil health of a garden. However, if birds are not a huge problem in your garden, we suggest you embrace them. Most of the time, birds are also hardworking garden allies, munching away on annoying pests like snails, slugs, and harmful insects.

Grasshoppers: Grasshoppers are sneaky pests and it took us a while to figure out they were getting to our plants. The damage looks similar to beetle and slug damage: large bites out of the leaves of plants. To prevent grasshoppers you can use diatomaceous earth or try the flour method, explained below.

Organic pest control options

Beer: Simply fill a cup or jar about ¾ of the way to the top with dark ale. Bury the cup in the dirt so that the rim is just slightly above the soil. The slugs will be drawn to the yeast in the beer, and once they lean in for a quick sip, should fall right in and drown. This often captures other pests as well.
pic4-min

Diatomaceous Earth: This is a natural product collected from the ocean; it is made up of tiny crushed up shells of creatures called diatoms. It feels soft in our hands but to an insect, walking on diatomaceous earth is like walking on broken glass. Beetles to  caterpillars will be lacerated and dehydrated from the diatomaceous earth and will thus die. Spreading a thin layer on the leaves of affected plants is helpful in controlling a wide variety of crawling insects. While diatomaceous earth is safe for humans, we recommend using a dust mask and eye covering to avoid inhaling it or getting it in your eyes as it is microscopically sharp. Diatomaceous earth washes away so should be replaced after rainfalls.

pic5-min

Flour: Although we have not tried this method at the garden, we have read that it works similarly to diatomaceous earth in the prevention of grasshoppers. The flour is harmless to the plant but will coat the grasshopper’s wings and clog it inside. If you attempt this method, make sure you are using all-purpose flour without any added ingredients!

Newspaper wrapping (tomatoes): To prevent cutworms, we wrap a thin layer of newspaper loosely around your tomato plants when planting. To do this, simply rip a 1 inch strip of newspaper and loosely wrap it around the base of the plant a few times. Then place the plant in the earth and cover the bottom half of the paper collar with dirt so it stays on.

pic6-min

Basil: The oils in basil are said to repel thrips, flies and mosquitoes. We plant basil alongside tomatoes which is said to make them larger and tastier. Basil also tends to keep away tomato hornworms.

Marigolds: Like basil, marigolds are another addition to your garden with a dual purpose. The marigolds are bright and beautiful, and also provide a well-known pest control. Make sure you choose scented marigolds if you are using them as a repellent. It is also important to note that they may attract other insects such as spider mites and snails, so do not use marigolds if you have a problem with these other pests!

pic7-min

Covering: If you are unsure what is getting to your plants, and they are still weak, you can try covering them with a semi-permeable covering. We use Agribon, which is permeable to sunlight and water, yet helps keep bugs out. This covering can also help young plants adjust to the outdoors if they were grown in the comfort of a greenhouse.

pic8-min

Neem Oil: Neem oil acts as an organic pest control for some insects by disrupting their reproductive cycle, while causing other insects to stop eating and starve. Neem oil also remains effective even after the spray has dried on the plant, so it can be used as a preventative insecticide. Unlike synthetic insecticides, neem oil will not harm beneficial insects. It is important to record how often you spray any form of pesticides on your plants so you do not over cover.

Introduction of other beneficial insects: Not all insects that come into your garden are harmful. Many are good pollinators and many others will eat harmful insects. Therefore, it may be useful to encourage these beneficial insects to enter your garden. It is possible to breed them in your garden, but it may be cheaper and more simple to plant items in your garden that these insects, such as ladybugs, lacewings, hoverflies, and some wasps are attracted to. Each of these insects feasts on different pests so be sure to look up which you need to encourage in your garden. Additionally, each is attracted by different plants, such as cilantro flowers, Queen Anne’s Lace, tubular flowers, or clover. Beneficial insects are not attracted to frilly double flowers such as double petunias or hollyhocks, because it is too difficult for them to reach the pollen in a double blossom. It is important to provide a variety of flowers that bloom at different times throughout the season to attract the most beneficial insects to the garden.

More sources for Organic Pest control

Neem Oil

Beneficial insects

Flour method

Bird control

More pests we didn’t mention!

More creative organic control methods

More plants that double as repellents


Greening Reunion 2016

By Sustainability Office on June 17, 2016

With Reunion drawing in over 2,000 alumni, Colgate University decided to green the event. Preparation for reunion has taken place for a while, and thanks to the Alumni Relations Office, biodegradable utensils and cups were provided for all meals served on Friday June 3rd. We are proud to say this prevented sending plastic waste, that would have otherwise been used, to the landfill where it would have sat for over 500 years! No doubt these materials cost slightly more, but the price was definitely worth it. These biodegradable materials and the food will break down in about half a year (1). In addition, the catering team collected all recyclable materials.

Colgate Reunion’s normal food service providers have supplied biodegradable plates, napkins, and utensils for a few years now, and fortunately, this year, the beverage providers were also able to bring biodegradable cups, completing our quest for the biodegradable reunion event. The only trash generated during the Friday meals were ice cream wrappers from the infamous Byrne Dairy Chipwiches and hand-wipes used during the evening BBQ.

To coordinate the effort for a near Zero Landfill Reunion and to educate alums of our efforts, the Sustainability Office had dedicated student volunteers (pictured below) stationed at all bin areas during Friday’s meal times. These volunteers helped alums with what items were recyclable and what items were biodegradable (On your own, you can differentiate between these two by looking for either a leaf symbol or a normal recycling symbol). You can create your own compost pile of food scraps by following the instructions on http://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/garden/how-compost. On campus, the Colgate Community Garden also runs a compost program that community members can take part in.

We learned from this event and hope to make next year’s reunion even greener! We’d like to thank our volunteer team of students for their time, energy, and passion for this green event.

GreenReunion-min

Sources:

  1. http://www.ecoproducts.com/compost.html

Applications now open for the 2016-2017 Green Raider Internship Program

By Sustainability Office on June 15, 2016
Our recently graduated Green Raider interns.

Our recently graduated Green Raider interns

The Sustainability Office is pleased to announce positions for qualified students to implement and manage Colgate’s peer sustainability program. This is an exciting opportunity for Colgate students to get hands-on experience putting sustainability and green living practices into action.

Qualified interns will work up to 12 hours per week, during both fall (2016) and spring (2017) semesters. Official start date is August 22, 2016. Orientation is mandatory and will begin the morning of August 22nd.  Weekly work schedule is flexible, however, we will have mandatory team meetings once every week.

INTERNSHIP OVERVIEW AND PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES:

The Green Raiders will model and promote environmentally responsible behavior in on-campus residence halls by inspiring and educating their peers using proven community-based social marketing skills (no prior knowledge necessary). The Sustainability Office will hire enthusiastic, self-motivated, over-achieving students who have demonstrated a commitment to environmental sustainability.  The mission of the Green Raider Program is to help lower Colgate’s ecological footprint, reduce energy costs, and increase student understanding of environmental issues that will have lifetime benefits. More specifically, Green Raiders will:

  • Promote green living practices in each of the residence halls and the larger campus

  • Be an accessible resource to students on campus with any questions they may have about sustainable living

  • Promote the Green Living Program through the use of blogging, social media, email, and other outlets

  • Plan and execute high-profile campus events that engage and educate students with green living practices

  • Create materials and behavior change programs that inspire and influence first-year residents to practice environmental stewardship

OTHER REQUIREMENTS:

FLEXIBILITY AND OPENNESS TO CHANGE. Successful Green Raiders will be individuals who think critically, are problem solvers, can adapt to change, and who can turn a challenge into an opportunity.

TEAM PLAYER. Be a team player and take advantage of peer-to-peer education, learning the best practices from other Colgate Green Raiders. Successful Green Raiders will bring their own “flair” and innovative ideas to the program, but also know how and when to conform to the better judgment of the team as a whole.

BE A MODEL FOR SUSTAINABLE BEHAVIOR. Green Raiders are expected to practice what they preach and model sustainable living by recycling, practicing energy efficiency and water conservation, using alternative transportation, and practice other sustainable living strategies.

RECOMMENDED KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS and ABILITIES

  • Solid interpersonal skills and the ability to work effectively and respectfully in a collaborative, culturally diverse work environment

  • Detail-oriented and possessing the ability to accomplish results in designated time frames

  • Being comfortable working in a fast moving/changing environment and having the ability to handle multiple tasks simultaneously

  • Having the ability to effectively motivate community members to action

  • Possessing strong organizational skills

  • Having very good written and public presentation skills

  • Being computer literate and proficient in the use of Word, Excel, PowerPoint and other office applications

  • Proficiency with Google Apps (Drive, Calendar, etc.)

  • Having the ability to maintain a productive and healthy work/life balance

  • Knowledge of design and publicity, as well as associated design programs is helpful

  • Experience using social media networks, such as Twitter and Facebook, is helpful

The Office of Sustainability is particularly interested in applicants who have demonstrated a commitment to sustainability and are interested in using their work in sustainability to support their academic and professional objectives.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:

  • Updated Résumé

  • One-page cover letter explaining why you are interested in becoming a Colgate Green Raider and why you believe you will be a valuable addition to our team

  • Submit your application through the portal or via email (sdickinson@colgate.edu) by no later than 5:00pm, Friday, July 8, 2016. Successful applicants are expected to begin work on August 22, 2016. Daily work schedule is flexible and contingent on student class schedules, current projects, and scheduled meetings.

  • In order to have the most cohesive team possible, being on campus for the entirety of the academic year is preferred. However, with some current team members going abroad, there may be some flexibility in hiring new Green Raiders who are going abroad.

Contact Steve Dickinson (phone 315.228.6360; email sdickinson@colgate.edu) for additional information or follow-up questions.

css.php